I love Ripley.
(From issue #4 of Lumberjanes!)

I love Ripley.

(From issue #4 of Lumberjanes!)

comicsalliance:

MS. MARVEL: ALIENATION, EXHILARATION, AND THE BEATING HEART OF SUPERHERO COMICS
By Juliet Kahn
As the daughter of two very different cultures, as someone who grew up in a Spanish-speaking home, and as someone who has always turned to books to explain the vagaries of life, I’ve grown used to fiction aimed at “ethnic” young adults. It wears its consciousness on its sleeve, and ranges from the excellent — everything by the recently deceased Walter Dean Myers — to the execrable. The latter is didactic, joyless, and feels less written than assembled by a band of preening academics. There is no truth at the heart of it, only a clinical estimation of “otherness” that, in addition to feeling false, is nearly always boring. Comics have fallen into this trap for decades, though the character of color in question is almost never the protagonist. One weak swipe at relevance, usually in the introductory issue, is all we get before they slowly, implacably, fade into the background.
I was excited for Ms. Marvel from the moment it was announced. I reblogged it, retweeted it, called my mother about it, chatted it up at my local comic shop. But secretly, I was more than a little certain that it would suck in all the usual ways. Sure, the Jamie McKelvie cover was splashy, and sure, I was hearing good things about series writer G. Willow Wilson and artist Adrian Alphona. But I was girded for — and expected — twenty or so lackluster issues before cancellation.
The first issue came out, and it was good. Really good. It was bright and fun and electric with personality in every way a comic can be, from its color palette to its ending splash. Still, though, I was unconvinced — fantastic first issues have given way to mediocrity before.
But the second issue was great. And the third. And the fourth. And with the fifth issue and the first arc completed, I feel that I can finally let out the breath I’ve been holding and say that Ms. Marvel is truly wonderful work.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

MS. MARVEL: ALIENATION, EXHILARATION, AND THE BEATING HEART OF SUPERHERO COMICS

By Juliet Kahn

As the daughter of two very different cultures, as someone who grew up in a Spanish-speaking home, and as someone who has always turned to books to explain the vagaries of life, I’ve grown used to fiction aimed at “ethnic” young adults. It wears its consciousness on its sleeve, and ranges from the excellent — everything by the recently deceased Walter Dean Myers — to the execrable. The latter is didactic, joyless, and feels less written than assembled by a band of preening academics. There is no truth at the heart of it, only a clinical estimation of “otherness” that, in addition to feeling false, is nearly always boring. Comics have fallen into this trap for decades, though the character of color in question is almost never the protagonist. One weak swipe at relevance, usually in the introductory issue, is all we get before they slowly, implacably, fade into the background.

I was excited for Ms. Marvel from the moment it was announced. I reblogged it, retweeted it, called my mother about it, chatted it up at my local comic shop. But secretly, I was more than a little certain that it would suck in all the usual ways. Sure, the Jamie McKelvie cover was splashy, and sure, I was hearing good things about series writer G. Willow Wilson and artist Adrian Alphona. But I was girded for — and expected — twenty or so lackluster issues before cancellation.

The first issue came out, and it was good. Really good. It was bright and fun and electric with personality in every way a comic can be, from its color palette to its ending splash. Still, though, I was unconvinced — fantastic first issues have given way to mediocrity before.

But the second issue was great. And the third. And the fourth. And with the fifth issue and the first arc completed, I feel that I can finally let out the breath I’ve been holding and say that Ms. Marvel is truly wonderful work.

READ MORE

This week’s comic haul!

This week’s comic haul!

comicsalliance:

‘BATGIRL’ TO BECOME BEST POSSIBLE DC COMIC WITH NEW CREATORS CAMERON STEWART, BABS TARR AND BRENDEN FLETCHER
By Chris Sims
The past few weeks have brought some truly surprising and exciting announcements from the Batman corner of the DC Universe, but this one tops them all. Today it was announced that Cameron Stewart and Brenden Fletcher will take over as new writers on Batgirl, with Stewart providing covers and layouts for new comics artist Babs Tarr.
Any one of those creators alone would be a pretty big deal deal, but while Stewart and Fletcher are intriguing choices for the adventures of Barbara Gordon, the biggest news by far is Tarr, an illustrator and video game artist best known to ComicsAlliance readers for her incredible cosplay-inspiring art and frequent appearances in the Best Art Ever (This Week) feature. This is a move that we never saw coming, but one we’re completely in favor of.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

‘BATGIRL’ TO BECOME BEST POSSIBLE DC COMIC WITH NEW CREATORS CAMERON STEWART, BABS TARR AND BRENDEN FLETCHER

By Chris Sims

The past few weeks have brought some truly surprising and exciting announcements from the Batman corner of the DC Universe, but this one tops them all. Today it was announced that Cameron Stewart and Brenden Fletcher will take over as new writers on Batgirl, with Stewart providing covers and layouts for new comics artist Babs Tarr.

Any one of those creators alone would be a pretty big deal deal, but while Stewart and Fletcher are intriguing choices for the adventures of Barbara Gordon, the biggest news by far is Tarr, an illustrator and video game artist best known to ComicsAlliance readers for her incredible cosplay-inspiring art and frequent appearances in the Best Art Ever (This Week) feature. This is a move that we never saw coming, but one we’re completely in favor of.

READ MORE

projectrooftop:

Cameron Stewart, Brenden Fletcher, and P:R Pal Babs Tarr are taking over Batgirl with issue #35. This is the BEST. More info here!

projectrooftop:

Cameron Stewart, Brenden Fletcher, and P:R Pal Babs Tarr are taking over Batgirl with issue #35. This is the BEST. 

More info here!

Me too, Catbug.
(Panel from issue #21 of Bravest Warriors!)

Me too, Catbug.

(Panel from issue #21 of Bravest Warriors!)

ianmcginty:

spx:


KaBOOM! has announced that July’s Adventure Time #30 will be a special stand-alone issue that honors the thriving DIY (“Do It Yourself”), mini-comics culture, printed on uncoated paper and made to look like a homemade zine from the citizens of Ooo. This issue features a cavalcade of indie creators, including longtime Adventure Time writer Ryan North and artists Shelli Paroline and Braden Lamb; plus artists Liz Prince, Carey Pietsch, Rebecca Tobin, Kat Philbin, T. Zysk, Missy Pena, Jesse Tise, Ian McGinty, David Cutler, and Yumi Sakugawa.

via Adventure Time Goes DIY with Special Zine Issue | Graphic Policy

i did a really fun lady rainicorn story that’s all in korean, colored by fred stresing! it’s cool and fun and it’s about kissing hunks and babes

Aaa!! I’m so excited for this issue!!!

ianmcginty:

spx:

KaBOOM! has announced that July’s Adventure Time #30 will be a special stand-alone issue that honors the thriving DIY (“Do It Yourself”), mini-comics culture, printed on uncoated paper and made to look like a homemade zine from the citizens of Ooo.

This issue features a cavalcade of indie creators, including longtime Adventure Time writer Ryan North and artists Shelli Paroline and Braden Lamb; plus artists Liz Prince, Carey Pietsch, Rebecca Tobin, Kat Philbin, T. Zysk, Missy Pena, Jesse Tise, Ian McGinty, David Cutler, and Yumi Sakugawa.

via Adventure Time Goes DIY with Special Zine Issue | Graphic Policy

i did a really fun lady rainicorn story that’s all in korean, colored by fred stresing! it’s cool and fun and it’s about kissing hunks and babes

Aaa!! I’m so excited for this issue!!!

Revisiting old games, in which we explore three naming conventions: character’s actual name, player’s actual name, and random profanity.

Revisiting old games, in which we explore three naming conventions: character’s actual name, player’s actual name, and random profanity.

kateordie:

I do not think that word means what you think it means.